Showing posts with label writing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label writing. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

You've got the "WRITE" stuff!

Here is a developmental writing continuum that shows the stages of writing all children go through. You can use it as a guide to determine if a student needs more practice time, fine motor skill activities, etc. It is very interesting to see the stages of writing children go through. Remember, in the beginning attempts at writing, the focus should not be on if the letters make real words or are misspelled, but just on the actual practice of writing itself.
 


tina winkle stay magical

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Handy Dyslexia Chart

This week I have been reading The Gift of Dyslexia by Ronald D. Davis. 
I saw this great chart online from TES and thought it was too good not to share. It gives teachers an idea of signs a student may show that they have Dyslexia. Now the book is very good at connecting ADHD, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyspraxia and Dyscalculia together. I am just now getting into the chapters on how you can work with learners to help them strengthen skills in the areas that they struggle. Stay posted!


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Monday, February 6, 2017

Reading and Writing Difficulties

There are many issues that contribute to reading and writing difficulties. Some of these are physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, educational, visual, emotional, economical and cultural. The one contributing factor I will focus on is linguistic. According to Verhoeven, et. al, "The importance of linguistic factors in reading relate even more to reading comprehension processes... the linguistic processes involved in the comprehension of oral language strongly constrain the process of reading comprehension. These reading comprehension processes would include (a) the parsing of sentences into their constituent components; (b) the drawing of inferences to make the relations within and between sentences sufficiently explicit and thereby facilitate the integration of information; and (c) the identification of underlying text structure, such as the propositions within a text (micro structure), and the global gist of a text (2010)." After reading the article by Verhoeven, et. al., and reflecting on my own experiences working with struggling readers, I believe the implications are that deficits in language and linguistics often appear in the form of phonological difficulties. If a student is struggling in that area we must build that background knowledge students may be lacking in order to promote cognitive growth.



Some critical issues in reading and writing assessment are correctly identifying students who are at-risk, the validity and reliability of the assessment(s), and ongoing progress monitoring of students. The first issue depends on the accuracy of the assessment. Is it grade-level appropriate? Does the assessment cover various reading skills? Is it too long? Is it too short to even give an accurate depiction of that student's skills? These are questions I ask myself about making sure the identification process is as accurate as possible.


This goes hand-in-hand with validity and reliability when using an assessment tool. What is the data collection process like? How accurate is it? According to the Reading Rockets (2012) web site: "Assessments should represent clearly the content domain they purport to measure. For example, if the intention is to learn more about a student's ability to read content area textbooks, then it is critical that the text passages used for assessment be structured similarly."


Progress monitoring should be short and happen once a week or at least every other week. This is to make sure interventions are most meaningful and effective.




References



International Reading Association. (2012). A critical analysis of eight informal reading inventories. Accessed on January 16, 2013

from: http://www.readingrockets.org/article/23373/ .





Verhoeven, L., Reitsma, P. & Siegel, L. (2010). Cognitive and linguistic factors in reading acquisition. Accessed on January 16, 2013 from:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058530/ .

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Writing Prompt Wednesday



Hello friends!

Get ready to write! Here is this week's writing prompt:

I have had a very busy week!
I have taken a new job with the Metro Library System!



I am very excited and I will still be home schooling during the day. And I will keep blogging.
 New adventures are fun! 

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Putting a "Spring" in your step!



This is my doggy Kipper enjoying Spring. 
Kipper is 14 years old! Born in February 2002. 
And he is still my fuzzy-wuzzy, crazy dog.
Here's his un-glamour shot...


So Spring is here in its beauty! 
Sunday night we had a thunderstorm that was just nice to listen to.
I am ready to see bright dots of flowers appear all over Oklahoma.

I want to share some Spring teaching ideas.

I am obsessed with Eric Carle. The Very Hungry Caterpillar was the first book that really "spoke" to me in Kindergarten. So I was surprised to see this very easy paper plate caterpillar idea.

I cannot believe I never thought of making caterpillars out of paper plates. I know it is weird because as an early childhood teacher you think of a zillion paper plate craftivities for students.


This is one I saw on DiscoverExploreLearn. I think my son will like doing this as a part of science. We have been studying air and clouds anyway so it fits in. Plus, I think if we put objects in the balloon or taped to it, we can see how much weight it takes to keep the rocket from taking off. 

Pool noodles are in stores again right now. I know Dollar Tree has them, too!

You can have students be engineers and sketch and write out their building plans. I think it is always important to incorporate writing in centers.

Here are three really cool cardboard centers you can make very inexpensively (and don't forget to add literacy and math skills into them!)




And this is fun but very good for fine motor skills and a way to make writing an adventure...
put butcher paper under tables/desks and let your students write and draw about a topic you are studying.


Sigh. I love thinking outside the box. 

Please share any of your ideas or any you have seen others do in the comments section! 


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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Writing Prompt Wednesday!!


Today is Wednesday and it is time to get those creative writing juices flowing!





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Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Writing Prompt Wednesday-doodley doo!




First, I need to say Happy Birthday to my darling husband!
His birthday is today, but we picked up the cake we ordered the day before. So we had lots of ice cream cake yesterday. There are no regrets! 

Here is our picture writing prompt for the week! And I have nooooo idea how to explain what is going on in the pic!




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